Never Spill Another Drop of Fuel (Cans)!

by Darren O'Brien September 11, 2019 2 Comments

Never Spill Another Drop of Fuel (Cans)!

It was a Dark & Stormy night. Meaning it was a night where a good, stiff rum drink was in order! It was December. The temperature had dropped into the upper 30s. The wind was blowing a steady 30-plus, and the rain was subsequently pelting down at a sideways angle. The wind with three to four-foot waves were rocking the boat. And there I was out on the side deck, on my knees with a traditional 5-gallon diesel jerry can trying to fill the aft fuel tank - without spilling any diesel - so we could turn the heater back on.

It was after 8:00pm, the marina office and fuel dock had been closed more than four hours. So of course our trusty Wallas forced air diesel heater decided now was the perfect time to run out of fuel. There I was, yet again forced to do my seemingly annual "emergency fill" with our old diesel fuel can. Which, with its short flexible spout - located at the top of the can! - is very challenging to use on a standard deck fill. At night. With the wind, rain, and waves...

On Traveler, our 1979 Cheoy Lee 46 Long Range Cruiser, our heater is plumbed to the 200-gallon aft fuel tank (the twin Lehman 120s draw from the 640-gallon tank amidships). We are able to sound the main tank so we always know how much fuel is left. However, the aft fuel tank has no means of determining how much fuel is in there. (Yes, a Gobius-type tank level monitoring system is on our wish list.) So we can only estimate. And for the most part I have been accurate to a day or two. Typically, I'll announce to Lisa something to the effect "we're going to need to get heater fuel in the next couple of days". But sometimes, the weather and/or our schedule precludes us from ambling over to the fuel dock to more easily fill the aft tank until it's too late. 

That's why we are so happy to now have onboard the latest in fuel can technology with the Edson SureCan. In a nutshell, I can now fill the darn tank at absolutely any time without getting on my knees and struggling to avoid spilling diesel. In fact, I'll never spill another drop of fuel!

The Edson SureCan is the first of its kind and the only fuel can available with the nozzle attached to the outside bottom of the can. Your hands will never get coated with fuel while trying to attach the nozzle. Just rotate the SureCan Nozzle down, pull the trigger and feed your fuel tank. With a long enough spout on the nozzle to reach the most difficult fuel tanks, there are no funnels required. The SureCan is made from 6 layers of Polyethylene, with a middle layer that prevents the smell of fuel from escaping through the can. And by easily controlling the flow of fuel with the trigger, you never have to worry about a problematic overfill - let alone a spill.

In addition to our 5-gallon diesel SureCan, we picked up the 2.2-gallon gasoline SureCan. That was also a major improvement! We used two gas cans while out cruising (for the dinghy motor and our backup portable Honda generator). One was 5-gallons, the other 2-gallons. Both cans are less than 6 years old, so they came equipped with those newer "safety pour" spouts. You know, the kind where you have to twist and unlock the pour mechanism then rest a dispense trigger on the edge of the fill neck and literally push to initiate the flow of gas? I don't know how many kinds there are, but both our different safety spouts were difficult to use. They didn't always want to work. In fact, one of them stopped working at all (so I had to swap them out when I wanted to pour gas).

As well, when we had to use the Honda generator we placed it up on the flybridge. Filling the generator was always problematic with the old gas cans, as they were hard to control the flow of fuel. And the generator fill was narrow enough that it was difficult to see how close to the fill line the gas was. I over filled the darn thing a couple of times, cursing as gas spilled on our nice KiwiGrip deck. With the new Edson 2.2-gallon gas SureCan, I don't have those problems anymore. I can easily control the rate of fuel flow, and I can see how full the tank is getting.

So maybe you can now understand why we're so excited about something as mundane as fuel cans. I'm confident that even if it's a Dark & Stormy kind of night, it'll be so much easier to dispense fuel. And I'll never spill another drop, either!

Award-winning Edson SureCans are available in our online store in the the following sizes and fuel types:

  • 5-gallon diesel (yellow can) - $49.98
  • 5-gallon gas (red can) - $49.98
  • 2.2-gallon gas (red can) - $39.98
  • 5-gallon kerosene (blue can) - $49.98

 

Believe me, they're definitely worth the price! After you use the Edson SureCan drop us a line and let us know what you think!




Darren O'Brien
Darren O'Brien

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October 27, 2019

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October 27, 2019

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